Blue Light Glasses – Helpful or Just Hype?

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Blue Light Glasses – Helpful or Just Hype?

ri­­­­n Lynn Sattler started worrying when her vision became blurry while using the computer, but her eye doctor said her eyes were fine. Then she got a new computer at work, with a much brighter screen, and her eyes and head started hurting. She’d heard of blue light glasses and did some online research to learn more.

“For $50 I figured it was worth a shot,” says Sattler, of Bellevue, WA. “Lo and behold, my eyes don’t feel as strained, my blurry vision is gone, and as weird as it sounds, my face doesn’t feel so tired after work.”

Sattler is among the growing number of people who wear special eyewear to block or filter the high-energy blue light coming from digital screens. Market Study Report, a market research company, says the global market for blue light eyewear will increase to $27 million by 2024, up from $18 million in 2019. The advertised benefits of the glasses include less eyestrain, improved sleep habits, and prevention of eye disease.

But do blue light glasses really work? It depends on who you ask.

Because the glasses are a newer product, there’s not a lot of research to show either way. The FDA doesn’t regulate the eyewear because it’s not marketed as a medical device.

The American Academy of Ophthalmology says you don’t need them and has gone on record as not recommending any kind of special eyewear for computer users. The organization says blue light from digital devices does not lead to eye disease and doesn’t even cause eyestrain. The problems people complain about are simply caused by overuse of digital devices, it says.

“The symptoms of digital eye strain are linked to how we use our digital devices, not the blue light coming out of them,” the AAO says.

In the United Kingdom, the Association of Optometrists says there is “a lack of high quality evidence to support using BB [Blue Blocking] spectacle lenses for the general population to improve visual performance or sleep quality, alleviate eye fatigue or conserve macular health.”

But some eye professionals believe they have benefits.

Greg Rogers, senior optician at Eyeworks in Decatur, GA, says he’s seen the benefits of blue light glasses among the shop’s customers. The staff asks a client how much time they spend in front of a screen daily. If it’s 6 hours or more, some sort of blue light reduction technique is recommended, whether it’s glasses or a special screen for a computer monitor.

The Vision Council, which represents the optical industry, says “specialized glasses” are “one tactic” that might cut eyestrain. Samuel Pierce, OD, former president of the American Optometric Association, told USA Today he recommended using blue light glasses to lessen eyestrain.

source : https://www.webmd.com/eye-health/news/20191216/do-blue-light-glasses-work

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